Networking Your Network

networking-300x19980% of jobs are found through networking your network

Whether or not you are currently engaged in a job search, networking is a fundamental activity that should be embraced for numerous reasons. With time at a premium for most working adults, adding more to an already full schedule may feel like another obligation. It’s true that unless there is a clear intention and purpose, attending an event with a general notion of making contacts is unrealistic. It requires a plan and a purpose.

We recommend the 3-3-3 approach as a minimum goal for any event:

1. Choose a minimum of 3 people to connect with more than superficially. Listen. How might you help them?
2. Collect 3-business cards from people you spent time talking to.
3. Call within 3-business days and follow up with another time to meet.
Networking doesn’t always mean carving out hours to connect and make introductions. Technology has created unlimited opportunity to reach out on LinkedIn, Facebook, Classmates, alumni and special interest groups along with many other sites. You can renew relationships with former colleagues, research new interests or connect with people who are doing interesting things.  Joining organizations that are not related to your area of expertise brings you into contact with new people, who don’t know you as (fill in the blank). This is especially helpful in a transition period where you may be looking at a career change. Attend an industry function as a guest to see if that demographic is a good fit. An added bonus is learning more about aeronautics, public relations, marketing or perhaps community theater.  Be curious! You never know how you may be a resource for someone else and likewise, how you can develop broader connections and learn something new in the process.
MWeisner2018

Tips for Effective Networking

MH90043755180% of jobs are unadvertised and found through networking

Whether or not you are currently engaged in a job search, networking is a fundamental activity that should be embraced for numerous reasons. With time at a premium for most working adults, adding more to an already full schedule may feel like another obligation. It’s true that unless there is a clear intention and purpose, attending an event with a general notion of making contacts is unrealistic. It requires a plan.

We recommend the 3-3-3 approach as a minimum goal for any event:
Choose a minimum of 3 people to connect with more than superficially. Listen. How might you help them?
Collect 3-business cards from people you spent time talking to
Call within 3-business days and follow up with another time to meet.

Networking doesn’t always mean carving out hours to connect and make introductions. Technology has created unlimited opportunity to reach out on LinkedIn, Facebook, Classmates, alumni and special interest groups along with many other sites. You can renew relationships with former colleagues, research new interests or connect with people who are doing interesting things.

Joining organizations that are not related to your area of expertise brings you into contact with new people, who don’t know you as (fill in the blank). This is especially helpful in a transition period where you may be looking at a career change. Attend an industry function as a guest to see if that demographic is a good fit. An added bonus is learning more about aeronautics, public relations, marketing or perhaps community theater.

Be curious! You never know how you may be a resource for someone else and likewise, how you can develop broader connections and learn something new in the process.

Time Earned or Time Spent

“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” – Tolkien

A simple math calculation tells us that for the most part, we will have 168 hours a week to spend. Deposit this in your personal “time” bank and begin again on Monday with 7 days at your disposal. Yes, like yourself, I have often taken this for granted and have even wished for a challenging week to go faster and be over with. How frequently has that same desire to manipulate time been focused on slowing things down and savoring the minutes, lengthening the experience and appreciating a well planned schedule? Unless we are in a state of pleasure or pain, stressed or bored, conscious or unconscious do we pay attention to time?

Author Lavaille Lavette has another perspective and her focus on the measurement of time is not in hours or minutes but in seconds, yes seconds. To be precise, think about 86,400 seconds in a day. Picture thousands of anything; grains of sand, feathers, or even bulldozers. That is quite an image to hold in your mind’s eye. How different does it feel than the common expression of a day being a 24-hour period? How productive, efficient, driven and passionate are you and how are you spending your time, the gift that you did nothing to earn? Regardless, managing your time is useless unless you manage your purpose. When your intention is clear and your priorities are in place, your effectiveness is directed and the results more meaningful. Time constructively spent feels much more like time earned and is ultimately added to the bottom line of a life well lived, decisive, and fulfilling.
• Review your day
• Have you spent it on purpose or with purpose?
• Plan tomorrow and include one intentional act(ivity) that honors your purpose

©2013 Maureen Weisner