She Let Go

Most recently I was pondering the concept of “letting go” and it’s multi-layered meaning when I came upon this poem. Enjoy!282080_151733851568813_7813470_n

She Let Go

She let go. Without a thought or a word, she let go.
She let go of fear. She let go of the judgments.
She let go of the confluence of opinions swarming around her head.
She let go of the committee of indecision within her.
She let go of all the ‘right’ reasons. Wholly and completely,
without hesitation or worry, she just let go.
She didn’t ask anyone for advice. She didn’t read a
book on how to let go… She didn’t search the scriptures.
She just let go.
She let go of all of the memories that held her back.
She let go of all of the anxiety that kept her from moving forward.
She let go of the planning and all of the calculations about how to do it just right.
She didn’t promise to let go.
She didn’t journal about it.
She didn’t write the projected date in her day-timer.
She made no public announcement and put no ad in the paper.
She didn’t check the weather report or read her daily horoscope.
She just let go.
She didn’t analyse whether she should let go.
She didn’t call her friends to discuss the matter.
She didn’t do a five-step Spiritual Mind Treatment.
She didn’t call the prayer line.
She didn’t utter one word. She just let go.
No one was around when it happened.
There was no applause or congratulations.
No one thanked her or praised her.
No one noticed a thing.
Like a leaf falling from a tree, she just let go.
There was no effort. There was no struggle.
It wasn’t good and it wasn’t bad.
It was what it was, and it is just that.
In the space of letting go, she let it all be.
A small smile came over her face.
A light breeze blew through her.
And the sun and the moon shone forevermore.

By Rev. Safire Rose

OUCH! Stop Punishing Yourself

Mistakes-Precious Life LessonsMistakes, mistakes, mistakes…if we are human, we have all made them. We may have compassion for other people, yet too frequently we refuse to stop punishing ourselves for past missteps, indiscretions, poor planning, lack of judgment, etc. The list could go on forever. Too often we examine our own actions under a relentlessly unforgiving spotlight, long after the event has occurred. Yes, we have all experienced hurtful behavior and may have been the responsible person, yet for the most part it is possible to make amends or corrections.

From this moment going forward, put a statute of limitations on your mistakes. Stop punishing yourself. Give yourself a deadline. According to Dr. Alan Zimmerman, you might even create a short script for yourself like, “After this date (specify), I will not put myself down or beat myself up for this mistake or that failure (specify). It’s done. It’s over. I refuse to spend any more energy ruminating about it.” Moreover, hold yourself accountable for doing it. The blame game is so de-energizing and once you release yourself from the fatiguing dance, your confidence will improve, oftentimes dramatically.

With respect to the question of forgiveness, a bolder step is posited by Stanford University consultant, Dr. Fred Luskin , author of the book, “Forgive for Good”. He says, “You can let go of a grudge you’ve held against someone even if you never see or speak to that person again. Forgiving takes place inside the person who has the change of heart, not the person who is forgiven.” He never suggests that the behavior was okay or that the offender gets a pass on their actions. Rather, it is about taking care of oneself and not being the person who takes poison and waits for the other person to die. In fact, in the act of forgiveness you are the person who has taken back their power.

The same truth applies to self-forgiveness. When you forgive yourself for past mistakes, you also free yourself from the attachment to them. It takes a conscious effort to change old patterns of behavior. However, when you can take even a small step towards shifting your thoughts from blame and hurt to self-healing and peace, you are achieving a new level of self-care. Greater self-knowledge begets greater self-confidence and an opportunity to give “self-punishment” a rest.

ACTION:
• Who do you need to forgive?
• Write the script?
• Speak it aloud as many times as you find necessary
• Give yourself a BIG hug!

©2014 Maureen Weisner

Attitude NOT Aptitude Determines Altitude

1375286745Having the right skills and the proper credentials will more than likely be key in whether you are brought on board for the position or not. Companies often hire on aptitude and experience and fire on fit and attitude.

Each day we have the freedom to choose what our attitude is going to be. Managing this helps us define who we are, how we handle ourselves and how to deal with issues as they arise. There is no magical process, nor is it about being disingenuous. On the contrary, it speaks to the power each of us holds; when to decide how we want to engage with others and the influence it has beyond us. We do not operate in a vacuum and behaviors affect the group from the family to the organization.

Zig Ziglar said it best, “ We cannot change our past, we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way….I am convinced that life is ten percent what happens to me and ninety percent how I react to it. We are in charge of our attitudes.”

Think back to situations where things were seemingly out of control and it was your ability to decide on the spot. How are you going to be? Were you able to step back and assess swiftly or did you react in a way that exacerbated the chaos? It would certainly be a more perfect world if we had all the information we needed to make the best choices, but we don’t always. What we do have is the ability to take charge of the way we respond and possibly do some prep work in advance.

Chuck Swindoll adds, “The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude to me is more important than the past, than education, than money, than failures, than successes. It will make or break a company or a home.”

How does your attitude impact your altitude?

aving the right skills and the proper credentials will more than likely be key in whether you are brought on board for the position or not. Companies often hire on aptitude and experience and fire on fit and attitude.

Each day we have the freedom to choose what our attitude is going to be. Managing this helps us define who we are, how we handle ourselves and how to deal with issues as they arise. There is no magical process, nor is it about being disingenuous. On the contrary, it speaks to the power each of us holds; when to decide how we want to engage with others and understanding the influence it has beyond us. We do not operate in a vacuum and behaviors affect the group from the family to the organization.

Zig Ziglar said it best, “ We cannot change our past, we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way….I am convinced that life is ten percent what happens to me and ninety percent how I react to it. We are in charge of our attitudes.”

Think back to situations where things were seemingly out of control and it was your ability to decide on the spot. How are you going to be? Were you able to step back and assess swiftly or did you react in a way that exacerbated the chaos? It would certainly be a more perfect world if we had all the information we needed to make the best choices, but we don’t always. What we do have is the ability to take charge of the way we respond and possibly do some prep work in advance.

Chuck Swindoll adds, “The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude to me is more important than the past, than education, than money, than failures, than successes. It will make or break a company or a home.”

How does your attitude impact your altitude?