More $ Career $ Advice

pay-gapThere is no end of career advice to be found. It may be industry specific or so broad that it could apply to anyone. The latter is not especially useful, so when I read Sally Krawcheck’s piece as it related to her top career advice, it was with a focus on investment, investment in yourself and the significance of creating more dollars. She is the former president of a Bank of America Division and owner of a women’s networking community. “Women make 77 cents to a man’s dollar on average. While that amount has risen, it is not close to where it should be and the difference in the dollar amount is alarming.”

According to Krawcheck, “If we ask for a raise and get one big enough to close that gap, the investment we have just made in ourselves earns us nearly a 30 percent return on what, for many of us, is our biggest asset: our income stream. Compare that with investing in a 10-year government bond when it was yielding 2.48 percent, or in the stock market, which has returned 7.3 percent on average over the past decade.”

She continues, “Put another way, if we earn $77,000 a year and take that up to a man’s $100,000, we’ll see a net gain of $23,000 annually, $230,000 over a decade and close to $1million over the course of a career. That’s if we never request, or get, another raise.”

You may not close the pay gap in one jump, but all progress counts. There is a lot of money that’s left on the table for no reason other than no one asked for it. Compensation is based on performance among other things, so list your accomplishments, practice the ask and do not apologize for your request.
©MWeisner2017

5-Tips for Career Changers

binoculars1. Look at the issues that make you crave change and outline your goals
What are you satisfied with about your current situation? What are you dissatisfied with? Is it your boss or the culture of your organization? Or do you really want to change careers? Outline your goals- for example, more money, more time off or more flexibility. Write it all down.

2. Work to understand your inner critic
Observe thoughts that trap you with fear and prevent you from achieving your objectives. Write these down on a piece of paper, then crumple it up and throw it away to symbolize your freedom from thoughts that interfere with your goals and dreams.

3. Recognize recurring patterns in your life
What makes you happy? What are your recurring interests and social needs? What makes a work environment feel good or not so good to you? Write it down.

4. Network and investigate career interests that map to your goals and needs
Once you’ve identified your patterns and desires, start thinking about careers that make sense for you. Give yourself one to three months to explore your curiosity by finding people who do these jobs and talking about the pros and cons of their work. Explore anything and everything until you’re satisfied — or until your time runs out.

5. Make a plan that takes your financial situation into account
Change is never simple, but having a plan that outlines your steps and financial requirements makes it doable. Will your new career require additional education, a small business loan, time off from work or relocation? Make a plan with financial considerations and a realistic timeline that you can follow through on.

©MWeisner2017

Suffering is Always Optional

Nervous Business Woman Cringing As She Bites Her Nails“You can’t control the wind, but you can adjust your sails.” – Yiddish saying

Any adult can tell you that life is not linear and yet as human beings don’t we plan and create. What we know to be true beyond a doubt at this very moment may be changed or challenged in the next. As convinced as we are that the “terrible twos” of childhood are seemingly endless, fasten your seatbelt for the traumas of the teen years.

Yes, you may have a perfect life, the ideal career, fulfilling relationships, supportive friends, significant wealth and terrific health yet you may still be suffering. What is your daily dance about? Is it worry, anxiety, excessive thinking and more that might be keeping you from fully living your life?

We poke and prod, plan and plan even more in anticipation of the future and making it manageable and perhaps creating our notion of perfection. We cannot control the future and living there only increases our anxiety in the present. The more we resist whatever is happening now, the more we suffer and the more it persists.

Suffering = Change x Resistance

According to the author Steve Mitten, “The suffering you experience is equal to whatever resistance you give to the changes you experience in your life.” Once you accept whatever comes as a fact rather than purposeful acts to ruin your life, you can stop your personal suffering, step back and focus your energy on the reality of a situation, not the fantasy of what you wish it to be.

Helen Keller is often partially quoted, “When one door of happiness closes, another open.” However, her complete thought adds.”… but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.”

• What are your habits that may spiral into suffering?
• How willing are you to step into appreciation instead?
• Choose 1 action today that will focus your thoughts on the open door?

©MWeisner2016

 

Career Search: Other Places to Look

6a0105360968fe970b01347fdd88a8970c-500piCareer transitions do have an upside that is often obscured by the anxiety accompanying a proposed change even when you are the driving force behind it. Shifting your perspective can lead to a more creative approach and in the process deepen your learning about what pleases you, what you are good at and what might be another way to broaden your focus. Take some time to answer the questions below. This really is about YOU! 

1. What problems make you want to discover a better way of doing something?
________________________________________________________________

2. What topics are you drawn to find out more about?
________________________________________________________________

3. What are your favorite books and/or movies?
________________________________________________________________

4. What subjects are represented by the books on your bookshelves?
________________________________________________________________

5. What did you always want to be when you grew up?
________________________________________________________________

6. What subjects fascinated you as a child?
________________________________________________________________

7. What life experiences or life-changing events make you want to share what you’ve learned with others?
________________________________________________________________

8. What process or set of steps do you do regardless of the topic or task at hand?
________________________________________________________________

9. What tools, equipment, or raw material do you like to use in your work?
________________________________________________________________

10.What characteristics describe your favorite clients or customers? (Age, gender, belief system, cultural/ethnic background, life stage, education level, income level, problem or life situations, shared interest, lifestyle, particular talent, etc.)
_______________________________________________________
© 2015 Maureen Weisner

Women by the Numbers

happy-woman-fotolia_12331389_subscription_xxlI am always skeptical about absolute numbers and their source. We know how statistics can be skewed to support almost any position, so while I remain open, the following numbers are a significant reflection of changes from the world I grew up in.

1. According to current research, women now fill the majority of jobs in the US.

2. Bloomberg reports that women now fill 51.4% of professional and managerial positions. Another study showed that 60% of all Masters Degrees are awarded to women.

3. Twenty-three percent of men don’t earn as much as their wives. Single women between the ages of 22 and 30 earned 8% more than men in that age group in most American cities.

4. C Level moms are no longer remarkable. In the IT sector, it became more common when we saw organizations like Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, EBay and Yahoo run by women who often had families as well as high level careers.

5. Homes are now purchased twice as often by women than men.

6. Single motherhood is now frequently a conscious lifestyle choice worldwide.

7. Futurist Faith Popcorn reports that a third of Japanese women in their 30s are unmarried.

8. Asians are leading the business trends toward more matriarchy with a third of Thailand’s CEOs being women and China showing 34% of all senior management positions as held by them.

9. Catalyst Organization reported in December 2011 that in the US those organizations with higher levels of gender diversity in the boardroom outperform companies with zero board women by 84% on sales, 60% on invested capital and 46% on return on equity.

Notice the trends:
• Which of the above describes you, your friends, colleagues and associates?
• What do you expect the impact to be on your career? Personal life?
• How will these trends affect your decisions going forward?

© Maureen Weisner

Let it GO!

greatest-strength-greatest-weaknessStuck in traffic or behind someone who is paying for groceries with a check, I am beyond agitated and these are not isolated parts of my day. And who whips out a checkbook at the supermarket anymore? Yes, I am making terrible judgments about this stranger based on the fact that she is slowing me down, getting in the way and hindering my progress to get to the next place…the gym. It would be a perfect sequence if I were wreaking havoc on the people in my wake in order to get to a yoga class, but that would slow me down and I need to get where I am going, NOW!

What is it about stress that makes us hop on an increasingly emotional escalator to more tension and strain? Is everything urgent or simply important yet we’ve assigned a value to it that places us at the vortex of more ongoing pressure?

Many experts agree that what stresses us out is really a battle for control. Feeling powerless at the mercy of a challenging client or waiting for your seatmate to jockey for space on the armrest, we are constantly on guard for the next incident. The desire to manage what we can, in spaces we do control, can provide some measure of relief in an increasingly chaotic world. For example, after 9/11, there was a surge of interest in decluttering and organizing. We may not be able to get to the gym, but we can clean out the closet and be ready for the next big thing. It’s empowering to view the fruits of our efforts and know that this single act may be the start of some major purge or at the very least, a way to manage a small corner of our environment.

What’s next? An organized closet may just be the springboard to a new career!

©MWeisner2015

Suffering is Optional

imagesCAKC7FR7“You can’t control the wind, but you can adjust your sails.” – Yiddish saying

Any adult can tell you that life is not linear and yet as human beings don’t we plan and create. What we know to be true beyond a doubt at this very moment may be changed or challenged in the next. As convinced as we are that the “terrible twos” of childhood are seemingly endless, fasten your seatbelt for the traumas of the teen years.

Yes, you may have a perfect life, the ideal career, fulfilling relationships, supportive friends, significant wealth and terrific health yet you may still be suffering. What is your daily dance about? Is it worry, anxiety, excessive thinking and more that might be keeping you from fully living your life?

We poke and prod, plan and plan even more in anticipation of the future and making it manageable and perhaps creating our notion of perfection. We cannot control the future and living there only increases our anxiety in the present. The more we resist whatever is happening now, the more we suffer and the more it persists.

Suffering = Change x Resistance

According to the author Steve Mitten, “The suffering you experience is equal to whatever resistance you give to the changes you experience in your life.” Once you accept whatever comes as a fact rather than purposeful acts to ruin your life, you can stop your personal suffering, step back and focus your energy on the reality of a situation, not the fantasy of what you wish it to be.

Helen Keller is often partially quoted, “When one door of happiness closes, another open.” However, her complete thought adds.”… but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.”

• What are your habits that may spiral into suffering?
• How willing are you to step into appreciation instead?
• Choose 1 action today that will focus your thoughts on the open door?

© 2015 Maureen Weisner

Career Advice

pay-gapThere is no end of career advice to be found. It may be industry specific or so broad that it could apply to anyone. The latter is not especially useful, so when I read Sally Krawcheck’s recent piece as it related to her top career advice, it was with a focus on investment, investment in yourself and the significance of creating more dollars. She is the former president of a Bank of America Division and the owner of a women’s networking community. “Women make 77 cents to a man’s dollar on average. While that amount has risen, it is not close to where it should be and the difference in the dollar amount is alarming.”

According to Krawcheck, “If we ask for a raise and get one big enough to close that gap, the investment we have just made in ourselves earns us nearly a 30 percent return on what, for many of us, is our biggest asset: our income stream. Compare that with investing in a 10-year government bond now yielding 2.48 percent, or in the stock market, which has returned 7.3 percent on average over the past decade.”

She continues, “Put another way, if we earn $77,000 a year and take that up to a man’s $100,000, we’ll see a net gain of $23,000 annually, $230,000 over a decade and close to $1million over the course of a career. That’s if we never request, or get, another raise.”

You may not close the pay gap in one jump, but all progress counts. There is a lot of money that’s left on the table for no reason other than no one asked for it. Compensation is based on performance among other things, so list your accomplishments, practice the ask, be prepared for pushback and do not apologize for your request.
©MWeisner2014